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Up Topic The Rybka Lounge / Computer Chess / Oh! Umh! A Poppers nightmare!
- - By Dr.X (Gold) Date 2017-11-18 17:23 Edited 2017-11-18 17:27
Intel's Skylake-X CPUs will be as much of a thermal nightmare as Kaby Lake

By
Rhys Coleman

It would seem Intel are still attempting to save money in the manufacture of the new CPUs by opting not to solder the CPU to the CPU’s integrated heat spreader (IHS). Instead, they’ve chosen to make use of a thermal interface material (TIM), which has inferior thermal conductivity to a soldered chip.
This can cause heat problems - especially when overclocking. Given this is the first time Intel won’t be using a soldered IHS for one of their high-end desktop platforms, blue team fans are up in arms about a decision that seems to have been motivated by the cost and convenience of manufacturing rather than customer satisfaction. Which is particularly galling given the fact that five of the Skylake-X chips are retailing for between $999 and $1,999. Cheap chips they ain't.


Asus confirmed to us the news of X299 chips’ lack of solder is indeed true. We spoke to one of their reps during their motherboard workshop at Computex yesterday about the overclocking potential of a delidded Skylake-X CPU. They've been seeing a 30°C drop in temperatures by popping the top on the chip and using a liquid metal thermal interface.
He went on to explain Skylake-X shares the same issue as Kaby Lake - temperatures rise at lightning speed when upping the voltage going into the processor, meaning 1.3V of power is roughly the maximum amount of juice you’ll want to pump into it without serious cooling. The Asus team did manage to get 4.3GHz out of the ten-core 7900X with 1.25V of power though, so the chips will still be pretty capable even at default voltages.


Has anyone ever popped the lid on their cpu of one of Intel's unsoldered chips to decrease heating and increase overclocking performance?

Parent - - By Labyrinth (*****) [us] Date 2017-11-18 21:51

>Has anyone ever popped the lid on their cpu of one of Intel's unsoldered chips to decrease heating and increase overclocking performance?


Anyone here? Not sure. This is a super common thing though, and if you use say conductonaut you can get -20° C.
Parent - By Dr.X (Gold) Date 2017-11-18 22:10
Yeah! But it is risky business. But if you chose to buy into a Skylake processor?
Parent - - By Banned for Life (Gold) Date 2017-11-18 21:56
Ugh!

"It would seem Intel are still attempting to save money in the manufacture of the new CPUs by opting not to solder the CPU to the CPU’s integrated heat spreader (IHS). Instead, they’ve chosen to make use of a thermal interface material (TIM), which has inferior thermal conductivity to a soldered chip."

"Asus confirmed to us the news of X299 chips’ lack of solder is indeed true. We spoke to one of their reps during their motherboard workshop at Computex yesterday about the overclocking potential of a delidded Skylake-X CPU. They've been seeing a 30°C drop in temperatures by popping the top on the chip and using a liquid metal thermal interface."

Rhys Coleman clearly isn't a thermodynamics guru. Note that ASUS didn't solder on the heatsink, but instead used a better and more expensive TIM than Intel provided in the stock CPU. The problem with solder is that it doesn't result in the smallest distance between the die and the heat spreader, and lead-free solder consists mainly of Tin, which doesn't have the best thermal characteristics. A good TIM with gallium and indium to reduce the melting point below the working temperature of the CPU, along with well mated surfaces and lots of pressure provides a better thermal interface. Intel probably didn't do this for one of two reasons; Either it cost too much, or it wouldn't provide the reliability they were looking for...
Parent - - By Dr.X (Gold) Date 2017-11-18 22:09
Do you have any info on the  Broadwell-E processors?
Parent - - By Banned for Life (Gold) Date 2017-11-18 22:19
Not from an overclocking perspective. When you use them for commercial purposes (as I do), you are mainly interested in performance and reliability with stock settings, which is presumably what is driving Intel's decision making process. The OC community isn't negligible, but it isn't an overwhelming presence either.
Parent - - By Dr.X (Gold) Date 2017-11-18 22:44
I haven't bothered to OC!
Parent - - By Banned for Life (Gold) Date 2017-11-19 00:16
Then you should be able to use the stock configuration, right?
Parent - By Dr.X (Gold) Date 2017-11-19 03:53
Yes, and there are a number of them. I've just not messed with them as much as I'd rather set my own parameters when overclocking. It just hasn't been a priority.
Up Topic The Rybka Lounge / Computer Chess / Oh! Umh! A Poppers nightmare!

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