Not logged inRybka Chess Community Forum
Up Topic The Rybka Lounge / Computer Chess / 10 Lessons to be Learned from todays Top Engines
- - By Josef (**) Date 2013-01-03 20:22
Hi,

and a happy new year 2013 to everbody!
I hope you had contemplative holidays with lots of time for computer chess. I fortunately could detour a little fraction of my rare spare time for the absolutely meaningful activity of playing (letting play, to be precise) around with my 3 supertopengines, namely being Stockfish 2.3.1, Komodo 5 (aka "the candidates") and ... guess who ... tataaa ... Houdini 3 (aka "The Champ")!!!  As always when fiddling with these from my modest point of view inconceiveable strong supernatural chess entities I learned a lot for my own decent understanding of the game. In this posting I will try to show you the 10 most insightful lessons I learned these days.

For complete games scroll to the end of this post.

Lesson 1: An intermediate check is not always for free

6k1/6r1/pr6/3P1b2/5Pq1/3NR2p/PP1Q3K/5R2 w - - 0 44

Komodo - Houdini

The candidate is 2 Pawns up, but The Champ has a dangerous flank attack, so both engines see some advantage for black, although not yet decisive.

The Champ has the immediate threat Qg2 which the candidate must meet with 44.Ne1. But the candidate thinks an intermediate check can always be thrown in and plays 44.Re8+??. The problem with this move is that it hands the critical g3 square to the Black Queen. After 44. ... Kh7 there is no further check, nor finds the candidate the time to bring the Rook back again.

45.Ne1 Rh6!. At first glance this seems less forcing than the immediate Qg3, but analysis show that the order of these 2 moves doesn't matter. Rh6 threats #8, since the h3 Pawn will queen on f1, so the candidate has to protect that square.

46.Qe2 Qg3+ 47.Kh1 h2

4R3/6rk/p6r/3P1b2/5P2/6q1/PP2Q2p/4NR1K w - - 0 48

Game over. The candidate gets killed on g1.

Lesson 2: Read the board before you castle

In the majority of games castling is the logical finish of the development, secures the King and connects the Rooks. But sometimes positions arise where castling (at the wrong time into the wrong direction) actually looses a game. That is what we see in this game:

r1bqk2r/p2n1pp1/2pbpn1p/1p6/3P2P1/2N1PN2/PPQBBP1P/R3K2R b KQkq - 0 10

Houdini - Komodo

The Champ already started a pawnstorm with g4. All of it's pieces are in place for a kingside attack, and The Champ may immediately castle at either side. If the candidate castles kingside now, The Champ will castle queenside and supply the inferior with a full battery attack. The candidate cannot defend, since the d4 pawn prevents him transferring his pieces kingside. His only chance is a counterattack on the queenside, which is likely too slow against The Champs superior development. So Blacks strategy here is to calmy keep developing until White has castled, and then castle same side.

The candidate castles kingside and looses the game within 25 moves. But I personally believe he committed yet another blemish within this game, which I would formulate as

Lesson 3: If your opponent is playing a king attack against you, do not deliberately open up his lines

2r2rk1/pbqn1pp1/2p1pn2/1pP3N1/8/4P3/PPQBBP1P/R3K1R1 b Q - 0 16


In this position the candidate played 16. ... Qxh2? 17.0-0-0 Qxf2?. I believe it's actually these two Black moves which bring The Champs attack to full speed.

The game ends with The Champ winning the candidates queen, sitting deeply and desolate within hostile territory, via a discovered check. I therefore would postulate even a third lesson from this deeply instructional game:

Lesson 4: Don't grab your opponents Pawns with your Queen in the opening

5r1k/pbrn1ppB/2p1pn2/1pP3N1/8/4P3/PPQB1q2/2KR3R b - - 0 20


Here the candidate already looks bruised, but it's not yet visible how it could be mated or the discovered check could be exploited. Now look at this combination:

21.Ne4!

If the candidate takes the Knight it's #4: 21. ... Nxe4 22.Bxe4+ Kg8 23.Bh7+ Kh8 24.Bg8+ Kxg8 25.Qh7++. So the Queen has to move, and there are only squares allowing a discovered check.

21. ... Qe2 22.Nxf6! Threatening #1 Nxf6 23.Bd3+

5r1k/pbr2pp1/2p1pn2/2P5/1p6/3BP3/PPQBq3/2KR3R b - - 0 23


The candidate doesn't get even any small compensation for the Queen.

Lesson 5: Sacrificing into a draw might be an option

Wow, Komodo got beaten really bad in the last game, so to not get into suspicion of picking only the worst performances of this undisputed sophisticated engine (I surely don't want to demotivate Komodos creators. Keep on your gorgeous work, guys!!!) I will show two of its successfull games now. Unfortunately not against The Champ (this engine seems way to strong to show us any instructional failures) but against Stockfish at least.

1rrq2k1/3b3p/p2p3Q/4pp2/1PPpp3/P5P1/6BP/2R2RK1 w - - 0 30

Komodo - Stockfish

Here Stockfish (I have to call the candidates by name in a 2 candidates game) has gained distinct advantage: 2 extra pawns and 3 passed pawns against none from Komodo. I believe, without the tactical draw which actually happened, it's a lost position for White.

Do you see how White forces a draw here?

Look at this two piece sacrificial combination: 30.Bxe4! fxe4 31.Rf7! Kxf7 32.Qxh7+

1rrq4/3b1k1Q/p2p4/4p3/1PPpp3/P5P1/7P/2R3K1 b - - 0 32


Now is that cool or what??? The back up against the wall!!!

While the second sacrifice is completely forced, it's still to be examined if Black could keep some advantage by rejecting the first. The Champ says it's a draw in any case (and, to tell you the truth, I trust my Houdini).

Lesson 6: Castling into an open line is no general mistake

That was not bad from Komodo, but of course there are also lots of wins from this engine where it's showing superior positional insights. Like in this game against Stockfish:

r2qk2r/4npbp/p2p4/3P1p2/4p3/2N5/PPP1BPPP/R2Q1RK1 b kq - 0 16

Stockfish - Komodo

I wouldn't have dared here (as Black) to castle short into the open g-line. But Komodo adeptly shows that 16. ... 0-0! is not only ok here but even the strongest move, leading to a dangerous attack against the White King:

1r3r1k/4np1p/3p3q/3Pb3/N1B2pQ1/1P2pP2/P1P3PP/1R3R1K w - - 0 28


Although it seems Black still has no forced win here. White with it's 2 extra pawns has no problems after a Queen exchange. On the other hand, Black wins if he manages to play his Rook to h6 (and the other one to g8) while retaining his Queen, since Black cannot manage to defend on the g+h lines. White might try Bd3 to lock g6 for Blacks Rook, Black might counter with f5. But it turns out that if White constantly tackles Blacks Queen, Black has to play it to f6, blocking the Pawn. E.g. 28.Qh3 Qg5 29.Qg4 Qf6 30.Bd3.

Stockfish, for unclear reason, played 28.Qd7??, which looses exactly that single tempo Blacks attack needs to succeed. 28. ... Rg8 29.Qh3 Qg5 30.Qf6 (this is the tempo) Qf6 31.Qh3 Rg6 (the rook is out) 32.Bd3 (too late) Rh6 33.Qd7 Rg8 34.c3

6rk/3Qnp1p/3p1q1r/3Pb3/N4p2/1PPBpP2/P5PP/1R3R1K b - - 0 34


Komodo has gained a huge attack, but how to finish it off now? When you find yourself in similiar positions, you have to consider all kinds of sacrifices. Like here:

34. ... Rxg2!! 35.Kxg2 Qh4 36.Qd8+ Kg7

3Q4/4npkp/3p3r/3Pb3/N4p1q/1PPBpP2/P5KP/1R3R2 w - - 0 37


That's a funny situation. Black threatens Qxh2++ since the rook is in the way. After Rh1 follows Qf2++ since the rook is in the way. So Stockfish took the "middle solution".

37.Rg1 Qxh2+ 38.Kf1+ Rg6 39.Rxg6+ Nxg6 40.Rb2 Qh1+ 41.Ke2 Bf6 42.Qxd6 Ne5

8/5pkp/3Q1b2/3Pn3/N4p2/1PPBpP2/PR2K3/7q w - - 0 43


It took some time to organize support for the Queen, but now Komodo threatens the undeflectable 43. ... Qxf3+ Ke1 44.Nxd3++ so Komodo has to give it's Queen with Komodos attack still ongoing.

That was a nice display by Komodo, albeit not as forcing as The Champ generally plays it.

Unfortunately, in the next game Komodo again does less well. And I recognize a certain similarity with lesson 3 here:

Lesson 7: If your opponent is playing a King attack against you, strive to keep your pawn shelter in place

3r2k1/3q1pb1/ppr3p1/3pP1Q1/2pP1P2/P1P1B3/1P2R3/1R4K1 b - - 0 35

Stockfish - Komodo

Here Stockfish has got what I generally call an "awesome King attack". It will triple its heavy artillery on the g file, rip it open with the f pawn and crash in with the bishop on h6 to finish Komodo off.

Anyhow, as analysis show, its not that easy. As almost always in such dynamic positions, Black wants to exchange Queens. And he is quite near on this. 35. ... Qf5 attacking Rb1 would already force the trade, if Rd8 were protected. So Komodo has to address that first, e.g. by 35. ... Re8 (as The Champ suggests) and than, like in the previous lesson, constantly tackle Stockfishs Queen.

But see what Komodo actually played:

35. ... f6?? 36.Qxg6 fxe5 37.Qg5 e4?

3r2k1/3q2b1/ppr5/3p2Q1/2pPpP2/P1P1B3/1P2R3/1R4K1 w - - 0 38


35. ... f6 was the big mistake, but (as Houdini points out) 37. ... exf is still better than 37. ... e4.

Now, that everything is open, Black should at least drive its King away from the g file towards the closed center. But that's not Komodos intention:

38.Rg2 Rf8 39.Kf2 (consequent!) Rf5 40.Qh4 Rf7 41.Rbg1 Rd6 42.Ke1 (other then Komodo Stockfish drives its King away from the prospective open line) Qd8 43.Qh5 Tdf6 44.f5 Qd7 45.Qh2 Txf5 46.Lh6


6k1/3q1rb1/pp5B/3p1r2/2pPp3/P1P5/1P4RQ/4K1R1 b - - 0 46


In addition to the overworked tied Bg7 and Komodos open King Stockfish has the tactical threat Qb8. Komodo looses the Queen for a Rook.

At the end of my little chess course I will show 2 more games with The Champ himself behind the wheel, where there's always a lot to learn. One with Komodo and one with Stockfish, to avoid suspicion of being biased and letting one of the candidates get beaten more often.

Lesson 8: Never underestimate a rook on 7th

The rook on the 7th rank is one of the most basic stratagems in chess, being absorbed even by occasional players and presumably all serious chess engines around. But rarely in any chess position there is only one of this stratagems (or "imbalances" to throw in one most recent buzzword) to be considered. The expertise of a successfull chess player lies in correctly weighing several of these stratagems (which actually are not that numerous as a beginner might think) against each other and finding the correct relationship within  one concrete game position.

Now let's have a look at the concrete position for this lesson:

3r1rk1/p1n1p1qp/2p2np1/3b3P/1p1P1N2/6N1/1PPQ2P1/K3RB1R b - - 0 21

Houdini - Komodo

The Champ has already started one of his dreaded dynamic positional attacks, sac'ing his a2 pawn to get the attack going. Now he will win back the pawn with the double attack on g6. It can be shown easily (with any engine) that gxh looses. The candidate has one possible move for defending the g6 Pawn, Bf7, uncovering the e7 pawn and receiving a rook on 7th. So the candidate has 3 alternatives here:

1. having its pawn shelter completely ripped
2. playing Bf7 with The Champs Rook on 7th
3. playing g5

According to The Champ, Nr.2 is worst, Nr.3 best, although the attack still gets mildly hot after 22.h6.

The candidate sees that differently and plays 21. ... Bf7. It evaluates The Champs attack as not too dangerous. It even finds the defence 22.hxg hxg 23.Rxf7 Nfd5! aimed to drive the Re7 off the 7th rank.

3r1rk1/p1n1Rbq1/2p3p1/3n4/1p1P1N2/6N1/1PPQ2P1/K4B1R w - - 0 24


The Champ does not at all react but continues with the Knight sac 24.Nxg6!.

I truly tried to analyze this position together with The Champ, but after 15 minutes in the (cerebral) cloud I had to realize that this stuff is way to heavy for me. So suffice it to say that the battle skids into an inconceiveable massacre which, 11 moves later, settles in the following position with The Champ a bishop and a pawn up:

5k2/p1R5/2p5/8/1p1P4/3B4/KPP3P1/4r3 b - - 0 35


Lesson 9: If you play an opening line you don't understand, your position might shelter quickly once you get out of book

Stockfish comes with its own opening book (downloadable separately from the homepage; I still have sf-211-book.zip with ~ 14 Mb uncompressed size while they currently offer stockfish-231-book.zip which is even smaller). It's always interesting to examine how much the usage of an opening book helps a weaker engine against a stronger one with no book. So that's what I did in the match between The Champion and Stockfish.

In the game of interest the first 6 moves were set (B14, Caro-Kann Panow-Attack, admittedly one of the more complex openings). Then, the candidate started to play from book, while The Champ perfectly stayed in book by calculation. At move 12 the candidate started to calculate, but fell back into book one move later, and the engines stayed in book until move 16. That's unexpected, for one engine playing with an arguable small book and the other one with none at all. Furthermore, I looked up the line in 2 different databases (one being http://www.365chess.com/opening.php) and found it only up to move 10. I have no clue where these book moves come from.

Anyway, the position after the last book move is absolutely ok:

2rq1r1k/pp1b1pp1/1bn1pn1p/8/3PB3/P1NQ1N2/1P1B1PPP/3R1RK1 w - - 0 17


At depth 24 The Champ evaluates it with +0.20, while the initial position gets +0.24. So you could say they found one perfect opening (though there still are these little unesthetics they call "imbalances").

So, after 17.Rfe1 the candidate has to cogitate. What will he come up with? Na5?

Exactly: 17. ... Na5?

Ouch! That's not it. The Champs score immediately jumps to +0.62. Best is 17. ... Bc7.

18.Ne5 Bc6?

The next slip. Now the Champs score is at +1.20. The Champ thinks: Man, this guy really plays rubbish! To shorten this, I'll try a frugal opening trap from my childhood. Let's see if he likes eating center pawns...

19.Qh3 Bxe4 20.Nxe4 Qxd4 Gotcha!!! 21.Bxh6!!

2r2r1k/pp3pp1/1b2pn1B/n3N3/3qN3/P6Q/1P3PPP/3RR1K1 b - - 0 21


The Champs score is +4.89, and he stops the clock. The candidate is out.

From completely equal to dead lost in exactly 4 moves! Oh Stockfish!!! I believe your creators should examine that incident.

So, not to forget, my final chess lesson for this time:

Lesson 10: Certain pawns are poisoned

And concerning the question if an opening books helps one lower rated engine: better give them no book at all!

The Games

Technical Info: I played on a 3770@3.4GHz. The Matches Komodo-Houdini and Komodo-Stockfish were played single core with 25 min/game and player (no increment), 1 Gb hash/engine, 4 games in parallel. The Match Stockfish-Houdini was played quad core with 5 min (no increment), 2 Gb hash/engine. Stockfish used it's own book, Houdini and Komodo had no book. Openings were picked from the Suites Nunn, Silver and Noomen.

Lesson 1:

[Event "Komodo-Houdini"]
[Site "Ivy"]
[Date "2012.12.27"]
[Round "65"]
[White "Komodo-5-64bit"]
[Black "Houdini_3_x64"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C21"]
[PlyCount "129"]
[TimeControl "1500"]

1. e4 e5 2. d4 exd4 3. c3 dxc3 4. Nxc3 d6 {+0.22/20 42} 5. Bc4 {-0.10/18 30}
Nf6 {+0.22/21 32} 6. e5 {+0.06/19 23} Qe7 {+0.31/19 22} 7. Nf3 {+0.16/17 7} Nc6
{+0.29/20 25} 8. O-O {-0.10/19 37} dxe5 {+0.21/21 62} 9. Bg5 {-0.14/20 62} Qd7
{+0.30/19 36} 10. Qc1 {-0.16/19 54} h6 {+0.47/19 75} 11. Bxf6 {-0.10/15 7} gxf6
{+0.47/17 0} 12. Rd1 {-0.13/19 35} Bd6 {+0.32/20 35} 13. Bb5 {-0.21/19 79} Kf8
{+0.31/21 64} 14. Ne4 {-0.11/19 20} Rb8 {+0.44/19 28} 15. Qe3 {-0.23/19 28} Qe7
{+0.51/18 17} 16. Rd2 {-0.34/19 53} a6 {+0.58/19 36} 17. Bxc6 {-0.25/18 7} bxc6
{+0.58/17} 18. Rc1 {-0.37/18 35} c5 {+0.56/18 19} 19. Nxc5 {-0.31/17 24} f5 {
+0.56/20 20} 20. g3 {-0.40/18 52} f4 {+0.81/19 18} 21. Qc3 {-0.40/18 16} Rg8 {
+0.83/19 41} 22. Re2 {-0.43/20 138} f6 {+0.62/19 19} 23. Ne4 {-0.24/19 23} Bg4
{+0.62/19 13} 24. Rec2 {-0.36/19 38} Bf5 {+0.58/18 36} 25. Qc6 {-0.20/18 7}
fxg3 {+0.52/18 12} 26. hxg3 {-0.23/19 19} Rg4 {+0.39/18 14} 27. Re2 {
-0.12/19 35} Bd7 {+0.45/19 25} 28. Qc2 {-0.12/20 15} h5 {+0.39/19 19} 29. Qd2 {
-0.12/20 27} Bb5 {+0.12/19 19} 30. Re3 {-0.12/19 12} f5 {+0.67/19 19} 31. Nxd6
{-0.32/15 3} cxd6 {+0.68/18 0} 32. Nh4 {-0.41/17 17} f4 {+1.23/18 39} 33. Rf3 {
-0.41/17 4} Bd7 {+1.23/16} 34. Ng2 {-0.46/17 17} Kg8 {+0.86/18 41} 35. gxf4 {
-0.45/17 16} h4 {+0.91/17 11} 36. Kh2 {-0.35/16 16} e4 {+0.75/16 25} 37. Re3 {
-0.45/17 16} Qe6 {+0.58/18 54} 38. f3 {-0.32/17 14} Rg7 {+0.40/16 8} 39. fxe4 {
-0.19/17 9} h3 {+0.66/17 9} 40. Ne1 {-0.12/19 27} Qg4 {+0.56/19 14} 41. Nd3 {
-0.15/18 2} d5 {+0.66/21 19} 42. exd5 {-0.47/17 6} Bf5 {+0.76/21 8} 43. Rf1 {
-0.51/19 11} Rb6 {+0.82/20 7} 44. Re8+ {-0.57/20 24} Kh7 {+4.54/18 2} 45. Ne1 {
-2.19/18 12} Rh6 {+4.93/21 10} 46. Qe2 {-2.72/20 24} Qg3+ {+4.93/20 0} 47. Kh1
{-2.74/19 3} h2 {+4.93/19 0} 48. Qg2 {-2.75/18 3} Qh4 {+4.93/18 0} 49. b4 {
-2.44/16 15} Qh5 {+8.06/16 3} 50. Re5 {-3.58/18 10} Rxg2 {+9.15/15 0} 51. Nxg2
{-3.58/18 1} Rg6 {+8.07/14 0} 52. Re7+ {-3.88/19 11} Kg8 {+8.07/13 0} 53. Rfe1
{-4.04/21 16} Bh3 {+8.20/12 0} 54. Re8+ {-4.97/20 13} Kf7 {+8.20/11 0} 55.
R8e7+ {-5.09/20 3} Kf6 {+8.20/10 0} 56. R7e6+ {-5.27/20 3} Bxe6 {+8.20/9 0} 57.
Rxe6+ {-5.43/18 1} Kf7 {+11.13/20 9} 58. Rxg6 {-5.48/21 3} Kxg6 {+10.70/18 0}
59. d6 {-5.64/19 2} Qd1+ {+10.25/18 1} 60. Kxh2 {-5.64/20 1} Qxd6 {+10.15/17 0}
61. Kg1 {-6.58/20 8} Qxb4 {+10.44/16 1} 62. Kf2 {-7.83/21 11} Qd2+ {+10.45/15 0
} 63. Kg3 {-10.38/21 2} Qxa2 {+10.50/14 0} 64. Nh4+ {-M72/23 50} Kf6 {
+10.48/13 0} 65. Nf3 {-12.69/16 1 Arena Entscheidung} 0-1

Lessons 2-4:

[Event "Komodo-Houdini"]
[Site "Ivy"]
[Date "2012.12.26"]
[Round "27"]
[White "Houdini_3_x64"]
[Black "Komodo-5-64bit"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "D45"]
[PlyCount "49"]
[TimeControl "1500"]

1. d4 d5 2. c4 c6 3. Nf3 Nf6 4. Nc3 e6 5. e3 Nbd7 6. Qc2 Bd6 7. g4 h6 8. Bd2 {
+0.10/19 31} dxc4 {+0.12/17 56} 9. Bxc4 {+0.04/19 57} b5 {-0.05/19 77} 10. Be2
{+0.04/20 36} O-O {-0.08/19 80} 11. g5 {+0.27/20 31} hxg5 {-0.06/16 7} 12. Nxg5
{+0.39/20 44} Bb7 {-0.14/19 38} 13. Rg1 {+0.54/20 83} Rc8 {-0.14/19 34} 14.
Nce4 {+0.72/19 202} Qc7 {-0.14/19 18} 15. Nc5 {+1.56/18 17} Bxc5 {-0.56/18 40}
16. dxc5 {+1.42/17 1} Qxh2 {-0.56/18 2} 17. O-O-O {+2.39/17 34} Qxf2 {
-0.81/16 35} 18. Bd3 {+2.31/16 0} Rc7 {-1.64/18 77} 19. Bh7+ {+9.02/15 2} Kh8 {
-5.21/16 4} 20. Rh1 {+9.02/14 0} b4 {-7.40/19 59} 21. Ne4 {+8.93/13 0} Qe2 {
-7.78/20 25} 22. Nxf6 {+8.87/12 0} Nxf6 {-10.86/20 82} 23. Bd3+ {+9.78/11 0}
Kg8 {-10.96/19 6} 24. Bxe2 {+11.88/10 0} Re8 {-12.14/19 62} 25. Bxb4 {
+18.98/18 24 Arena Entscheidung} 1-0

Lesson 5:

[Event "Stockfish-Komodo"]
[Site "Ivy"]
[Date "2012.12.29"]
[Round "12"]
[White "Komodo-5-64bit"]
[Black "Stockfish-231-64-popcnt-ja"]
[Result "*"]
[ECO "B25"]
[PlyCount "75"]
[TimeControl "1500"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. d3 d6 6. f4 e6 7. Nf3 Nge7 8. O-O
O-O 9. Be3 Nd4 10. Qd2 {-0.14/19 68} Qc7 {0.00/20 30} 11. Rab1 {-0.12/18 22}
Bd7 {0.00/22 38} 12. Ne2 {-0.12/18 6} Nxf3+ {0.00/23 31} 13. Bxf3 {-0.13/17 5}
b6 {+0.08/24 41} 14. b4 {-0.13/18 34} Rab8 {0.00/22 28} 15. c4 {-0.13/19 45} a6
{0.00/23 24} 16. a3 {-0.09/21 76} Nc6 {0.00/22 38} 17. Bg2 {-0.13/20 28} Nd4 {
+0.08/22 34} 18. Bf2 {-0.09/19 28} Rfc8 {+0.16/23 32} 19. Nxd4 {-0.03/18 10}
cxd4 {+0.08/23 27} 20. Rbc1 {-0.05/19 10} e5 {0.00/22 25} 21. f5 {-0.05/19 10}
Qd8 {+0.48/23 31} 22. Be1 {-0.29/19 25} b5 {+0.52/26 28} 23. Qe2 {-0.32/20 43}
Bh6 {+0.52/24 36} 24. Bd2 {-0.27/17 5} Bxd2 {+0.44/24 35} 25. Qxd2 {-0.34/19 14
} bxc4 {+0.40/25 28} 26. dxc4 {-0.36/21 29} gxf5 {+0.48/23 23} 27. Qh6 {
-0.12/21 25} f6 {+0.48/23 98} 28. Bh3 {-0.12/22 23} fxe4 {+1.09/23 42} 29. Bg2
{-0.12/24 36} f5 {+1.41/25 86} 30. Bxe4 {-0.12/25 29} fxe4 {+4.40/12 0} 31. Rf7
{-0.12/26 14} Kxf7 {0.00/29 13} 32. Qxh7+ {-0.10/26 66} Ke8 {0.00/29 25} 33.
Qg6+ {-0.10/25 16} Ke7 {0.00/30 18} 34. Qh7+ {-0.10/27 33} Ke6 {0.00/33 27} 35.
Qh3+ {-0.10/27 17} Kf7 {0.00/36 21} 36. Qh7+ {-0.10/30 23} Ke6 {0.00/44 28} 37.
Qh3+ {-0.10/29 26} Kf7 {0.00/35 69} 38. Qh7+ {-0.10/31 42 Stellungswiederholung
} *

Lesson 6:

[Event "Stockfish-Komodo"]
[Site "Ivy"]
[Date "2012.12.30"]
[Round "49"]
[White "Stockfish-231-64-popcnt-ja"]
[Black "Komodo-5-64bit"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "B33"]
[PlyCount "93"]
[TimeControl "1500"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e5 6. Ndb5 d6 7. Bg5 a6 8.
Na3 b5 9. Bxf6 gxf6 10. Nd5 f5 11. Bd3 {+0.48/20 32} Be6 {-0.22/19 20} 12. O-O
{+0.48/21 45} Bxd5 {-0.30/22 77} 13. exd5 {+0.76/12 0} Ne7 {-0.30/22 8} 14.
Nxb5 {+0.72/23 28} Bg7 {-0.30/22 36} 15. Nc3 {+0.72/27 40} e4 {-0.28/20 8} 16.
Be2 {+0.76/23 28} O-O {-0.21/21 60} 17. Qd2 {+0.68/24 112} Rb8 {-0.26/20 27}
18. Rab1 {+0.56/21 43} Ng6 {-0.18/19 28} 19. Kh1 {+0.56/20 41} Qc8 {-0.12/21 31
} 20. Na4 {+0.72/23 66} f4 {-0.11/17 10} 21. b3 {+0.60/25 35} Kh8 {-0.06/20 46}
22. f3 {+0.64/22 30} e3 {-0.11/17 7} 23. Qd3 {+0.60/23 21} Qd8 {-0.08/19 33}
24. Qf5 {+0.60/23 23} Qh4 {-0.12/19 30} 25. Qg4 {+0.56/22 49} Qh6 {-0.04/18 17}
26. Bxa6 {+0.12/21 29} Ne7 {-0.02/19 29} 27. Bc4 {+0.20/22 23} Be5 {-0.07/20 72
} 28. Qd7 {+0.20/22 59} Rg8 {+0.25/18 13} 29. Qh3 {0.00/23 21} Qg5 {+0.79/19 21
} 30. Qg4 {-0.44/22 35} Qf6 {+0.98/20 15} 31. Qh3 {-1.65/21 18} Rg6 {+1.18/19 8
} 32. Bd3 {-1.73/24 46} Rh6 {+1.31/19 12} 33. Qd7 {-2.02/24 25} Rg8 {
+1.29/19 11} 34. c3 {-2.34/21 16} Rxg2 {+4.05/19 44} 35. Kxg2 {0.00/12 0} Qh4 {
+5.35/20 19} 36. Qd8+ {-5.49/24 24} Kg7 {+6.27/21 16} 37. Rg1 {-5.89/24 10}
Qxh2+ {+6.58/21 26} 38. Kf1+ {-5.89/12 0} Rg6 {+6.61/21 5} 39. Rxg6+ {
-7.47/26 20} Nxg6 {+7.02/22 34} 40. Rb2 {-5.17/12 0} Qh1+ {+7.17/22 138} 41.
Ke2 {-7.51/26 10} Bf6 {+7.43/21 15} 42. Qxd6 {-8.76/22 18} Ne5 {+7.46/21 14}
43. Qxe5 {-9.25/22 9} Bxe5 {+7.70/21 22} 44. Bc4 {-10.14/22 15} Qc1 {
+8.92/21 16} 45. a3 {-12.40/23 13} Bxc3 {+9.10/20 15} 46. Ra2 {-15.87/26 38}
Ba5 {+9.54/20 13} 47. Rb2 {-18.62/21 48 Weiss gibt auf} 0-1

Lesson 7:

[Event "Stockfish-Komodo"]
[Site "Ivy"]
[Date "2012.12.29"]
[Round "25"]
[White "Stockfish-231-64-popcnt-ja"]
[Black "Komodo-5-64bit"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B25"]
[PlyCount "116"]
[TimeControl "1500"]

1. e4 c5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 g6 4. Bg2 Bg7 5. d3 d6 6. f4 e6 7. Nf3 Nge7 8. O-O
O-O 9. Rb1 {+0.12/20 26} b6 {+0.15/20 38} 10. Bd2 {-0.04/20 28} Bb7 {
+0.15/20 62} 11. a3 {-0.20/20 34} Nd4 {+0.22/19 12} 12. Nxd4 {-0.24/20 35}
Bxd4+ {+0.26/18 6} 13. Kh1 {-0.28/22 31} Bg7 {+0.27/20 12} 14. Qe2 {-0.20/22 41
} Qd7 {+0.28/19 33} 15. Nd1 {-0.28/22 47} d5 {+0.22/19 23} 16. e5 {-0.20/23 27}
Rac8 {+0.20/20 94} 17. Ne3 {-0.20/23 52} Nc6 {+0.21/21 77} 18. Kg1 {-0.20/22 27
} h5 {+0.20/19 33} 19. c3 {-0.04/23 27} Rfd8 {+0.15/20 54} 20. Rfd1 {0.00/24 87
} Ne7 {+0.18/21 32} 21. d4 {-0.12/24 24} Bc6 {+0.14/20 10} 22. Bf1 {-0.04/25 29
} c4 {+0.14/21 40} 23. Re1 {-0.04/25 34} a6 {+0.14/23 32} 24. Bg2 {0.00/23 20}
Ba4 {+0.14/24 15} 25. h3 {+0.20/23 35} Nf5 {0.00/19 34} 26. Nxf5 {+0.32/26 21}
exf5 {-0.11/17 2} 27. Be3 {+0.48/25 37} Rc7 {-0.13/21 40} 28. Bf3 {+0.64/24 43}
Qc8 {-0.25/20 26} 29. Qg2 {+0.60/27 29} Bc6 {-0.23/22 43} 30. g4 {+1.29/25 65}
hxg4 {-0.13/21 5} 31. hxg4 {+1.21/12 0} fxg4 {-0.13/22 3} 32. Bxg4 {+1.21/27 27
} Bd7 {-0.21/20 9} 33. Bxd7 {+1.45/27 22} Qxd7 {-0.18/21 5} 34. Qg5 {
+1.33/28 45} Rc6 {-0.12/21 19} 35. Re2 {+1.33/29 23} f6 {-0.08/19 8} 36. Qxg6 {
+1.17/24 16} fxe5 {-0.02/19 2} 37. Qg5 {+1.33/27 24} e4 {-0.24/21 33} 38. Rg2 {
+2.18/26 25} Rf8 {-0.40/20 22} 39. Kf2 {+2.66/23 10} Rf5 {-0.45/21 14} 40. Qh4
{+4.08/24 17} Rf7 {-0.43/23 26} 41. Rbg1 {+4.36/25 22} Rd6 {-1.04/18 18} 42.
Ke1 {+5.09/24 14} Qd8 {-2.77/19 33} 43. Qh5 {+7.63/23 9} Rdf6 {-4.55/19 56} 44.
f5 {+8.08/23 7} Qd7 {-5.40/21 30} 45. Qh2 {+10.22/24 8} Rxf5 {-6.30/20 19} 46.
Bh6 {+10.22/12 0} Qc7 {-6.30/19 1} 47. Rxg7+ {+11.51/24 13} Rxg7 {-5.90/18 2}
48. Rxg7+ {+11.51/12 0} Qxg7 {-5.93/18 1} 49. Bxg7 {+9.93/12 0} Kxg7 {
-5.95/18 1} 50. Qc7+ {+10.62/12 0} Kg6 {-6.25/23 19} 51. Qxb6+ {+13.77/22 18}
Kf7 {-6.73/20 11} 52. Qb7+ {+23.07/23 15} Ke6 {-7.71/21 16} 53. Qc8+ {
+26.86/24 44} Kf6 {-7.71/20 1} 54. Qxa6+ {+21.97/22 7} Ke7 {-7.87/23 10} 55.
Qb7+ {+90.55/22 12} Kd6 {-8.69/21 19} 56. Qb8+ {+91.80/26 36} Kd7 {-11.52/22 15
} 57. Qg8 {+91.85/25 11} Rf3 {-11.96/18 1} 58. Qxd5+ {+91.85/20 30} Kc7 {
-12.44/18 1 Arena Entscheidung} 1-0

Lesson 8:

[Event "Komodo-Houdini"]
[Site "Ivy"]
[Date "2012.12.27"]
[Round "38"]
[White "Houdini_3_x64"]
[Black "Komodo-5-64bit"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A83"]
[PlyCount "93"]
[TimeControl "1500"]

1. d4 f5 2. e4 fxe4 3. Nc3 Nf6 4. Bg5 {+0.13/20 30} c6 {+0.11/20 23} 5. f3 {
+0.13/20 34} d5 {-0.12/20 189} 6. fxe4 {+0.36/19 23} dxe4 {-0.12/19 15} 7. Nge2
{+0.19/20 37} g6 {-0.14/19 51} 8. Qd2 {+0.42/20 29} Bg7 {-0.19/20 78} 9. O-O-O
{+0.41/20 20} O-O {-0.14/19 14} 10. Ng3 {+0.44/19 19} b5 {-0.19/18 36} 11.
Ncxe4 {+0.50/18 22} Qd5 {-0.15/18 19} 12. Nc3 {+0.50/16 0} Qf7 {-0.14/19 26}
13. Re1 {+0.53/19 25} Na6 {-0.12/17 24} 14. Kb1 {+0.57/20 39} Nc7 {-0.23/18 30}
15. h4 {+0.51/19 20} Be6 {-0.20/17 25} 16. h5 {+0.76/19 22} b4 {-0.11/17 26}
17. Nce2 {+0.71/18 60} Bxa2+ {-0.18/15 20} 18. Ka1 {+0.94/21 59} Rad8 {
-0.40/17 48} 19. Bh6 {+0.74/18 32} Bd5 {-0.39/17 21} 20. Bxg7 {+1.07/19 29}
Qxg7 {-0.48/17 13} 21. Nf4 {+1.03/19 14} Bf7 {-0.61/18 43} 22. hxg6 {
+1.91/18 15} hxg6 {-0.59/17 2} 23. Rxe7 {+1.92/17 0} Nfd5 {-0.13/18 6} 24. Nxg6
{+4.68/16 6} Rde8 {-2.73/17 29} 25. Rd7 {+6.80/17 16} Nf6 {-3.16/17 21} 26. Nf5
{+7.99/16 3} Qxg6 {-4.78/17 13} 27. Nh6+ {+7.63/15 0} Kg7 {-5.03/19 24} 28.
Rxc7 {+7.63/14 0} Nh5 {-5.20/20 76} 29. Nxf7 {+7.53/13 0} Rxf7 {-5.29/19 7} 30.
Bd3 {+7.36/12 0} Qg3 {-5.31/19 10} 31. Rxh5 {+7.36/11 0} Qe1+ {-5.51/20 20} 32.
Qxe1 {+7.27/10 0} Rxe1+ {-5.54/20 5} 33. Ka2 {+6.14/1} Rxc7 {-5.53/19 2} 34.
Rh7+ {+5.91/9 0} Kf8 {-5.59/21 6} 35. Rxc7 {+5.92/9 0} a5 {-5.58/21 1} 36. Rxc6
{+7.04/18 15} a4 {-6.09/20 18} 37. d5 {+7.72/20 22} b3+ {-6.37/19 24} 38. cxb3
{+7.72/19} Re3 {-7.14/20 22} 39. Rc3 {+8.02/18 1} axb3+ {-6.78/21 12} 40. Kxb3
{+8.03/17 0} Ke7 {-7.44/22 13} 41. Kc4 {+8.03/16 0} Rg3 {-8.18/23 27} 42. Be4 {
+8.03/15 0} Rg8 {-8.93/21 11} 43. b4 {+8.03/14 0} Kf6 {-9.18/23 18} 44. Kd4 {
+8.04/13 0} Rb8 {-9.82/22 10} 45. Rc6+ {+16.14/22 22} Kg7 {-11.16/22 13} 46.
Kc5 {+17.03/20 4} Re8 {-13.02/23 18} 47. Bg6 {+17.00/19 0 Arena Entscheidung}
1-0

Lesson 9+10:

[Event "Stockfish-Houdini"]
[Site "Ivy"]
[Date "2012.12.31"]
[Round "68"]
[White "Houdini_3_x64"]
[Black "Stockfish-231-64-popcnt-ja"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "B14"]
[PlyCount "78"]
[TimeControl "300"]

1. e4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. exd5 cxd5 4. c4 Nf6 5. Nc3 e6 6. Nf3 Bb4 7. cxd5 {
+0.46/19 6} Nxd5 8. Qc2 {+0.37/20 7} Nc6 9. a3 {+0.34/20 7} Ba5 10. Bd2 {
+0.36/20 5} O-O 11. Bd3 {+0.28/19 7} h6 12. O-O {+0.33/19 4} Bb6 {-0.24/22 13}
13. Rad1 {+0.24/19 4} Bd7 14. Bh7+ {+0.26/19 3} Kh8 15. Be4 {+0.26/21 3} Rc8
16. Qd3 {+0.24/20 6} Nf6 17. Rfe1 {+0.21/20 5} Na5 {-0.32/22 10} 18. Ne5 {
+0.62/18 5} Bc6 {-1.34/22 23} 19. Qh3 {+1.20/17 4} Bxe4 {-1.89/23 5} 20. Nxe4 {
+2.69/16 0} Qxd4 {-1.77/25 7} 21. Bxh6 {+4.89/15 0} Qxe5 {+0.32/13 0} 22. Nxf6
{+4.81/14 0} Qf5 {-5.49/23 6} 23. g4 {+4.74/13 0} Qxf6 {-7.11/24 11} 24. Bg5+ {
+5.42/12 0} Kg8 {-7.71/26 4} 25. Bxf6 {+5.42/11 0} gxf6 {-7.79/25 3} 26. g5 {
+7.07/21 11} fxg5 {-7.91/27 5} 27. Rxe6 {+7.08/20 0} Rfd8 {-7.71/25 8} 28.
Rxd8+ {+7.18/20 3} Rxd8 {-6.26/12 0} 29. Re5 {+6.60/19 0} Nc6 {-7.27/22 7} 30.
Rxg5+ {+6.59/19 0} Kf8 {-7.27/12 0} 31. Rg4 {+6.59/18 0} Rd1+ {-8.08/24 20} 32.
Kg2 {+6.57/17 0} Re1 {-8.64/25 15} 33. Qh8+ {+7.04/20 4} Ke7 {-8.32/20 3} 34.
Qh4+ {+7.04/19 0} Kd7 {-8.20/21 3} 35. Re4 {+7.49/19 1} Rxe4 {-9.09/21 3} 36.
Qxe4 {+7.67/18 2} Bd4 {-9.41/22 4} 37. b4 {+7.72/17 0} Bf6 {-9.73/22 5} 38. h4
{+7.83/16 0} Nd8 {-10.50/21 3} 39. h5 {+7.83/15 0} a6 {
-10.90/23 3 Schwarz gibt auf} 1-0
Parent - By ppipper (*****) Date 2013-01-03 20:57
Very nice post indeed
Parent - By Labyrinth (*****) Date 2013-01-03 21:40 Edited 2013-01-03 21:52
You typo'd Lesson 6, 30. Qg4 not 30. Qf6 :-)

Lesson 7 your notation went German with L for bishop, T for rook :-P

Still reading the rest, very interesting.
Parent - By thierrycatalan (**) Date 2013-01-03 22:28
thank you !!
for this very nice games and positions very instructives .
messages of this quality are too rare on the forum .

cordialement
Parent - By Hurnavich (Bronze) Date 2013-01-03 23:11
Hi,

Excellent post rare indeed a refreshing change!

Hurnavich
Parent - By Barnard (Bronze) Date 2013-01-03 23:18
very good post and very instructive

thanks
Parent - By keoki010 (Silver) Date 2013-01-04 00:01
Instructive post, very enjoyable. Please post more of the same type! :grin:
Parent - By nimzo5 (**) Date 2013-01-04 01:48
Fantastic post! Thank you for sharing.
Parent - By Nelson Hernandez (Gold) Date 2013-01-04 02:58
Re: Lesson 9

365chess.com isn't bad for what it does, but a number of us collect games and have databases much larger.  At your last book move, 16...Nf6 I have eight games still in book, the oldest dating back to 2007.  However I hang on through 17.Rfe1 (three games) before falling off on the next move.  If I was guessing, the game 365chess followed was a Stockfish 1.9.1-Naum 3 game from 2010.10.29; it looks like a published CEGT game.
Parent - By Fulcrum2000 (****) Date 2013-01-04 16:45
Nice post!

BTW The game of lesson 5 should be draw instead of undecided ( [Result "*"] )
Up Topic The Rybka Lounge / Computer Chess / 10 Lessons to be Learned from todays Top Engines

Powered by mwForum 2.27.4 © 1999-2012 Markus Wichitill