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Up Topic Rybka Support & Discussion / Rybka Discussion / "THE MECHANICAL ORANGE." My strongest Anti-Rybka human game
- - By Father (**) Date 2007-08-06 19:06
The mechanical orange

Hello everyone.
Some times, we have had, seeing a soccer game, the impression, that the losser team, made the best Job.
Then the losser team, without prizze, has the invisible craw.
Holand in the 70,s Soccer World Champion, was an example : " The mechanical Orange".
Paul Morphy, Chigorin, and Brostein, were others examples in the chess yard.
Not tittles in theirs own history as WCC, but, a great concept about them, many times,
as the real moral Top WCC.

The next game, could be a real " Strategic chess puzzle", in Man versus Machine; The man was clouse, but was not enough.
But the picture, the vivid descripcion in words, was, wrotten.

With best respect to Rybca Chess Community Forum.

Pablo

[D]
rnbqkbnr/pppppppp/8/8/8/8/PPPPPPPP/RNBQKBNR w KQkq - 0 1


[D]
r2qk2r/ppp2ppp/2nbpn2/1B1p4/3P1P2/2PbPN2/PP4PP/RNB1K2R w KQkq - 0 8


[D]
r2q1r2/ppp1b1k1/2n1p3/3p1p2/3PnPp1/2PBP1Pp/PP2R1NP/R3BNK1 w - - 0 19


[D]
r2q1r2/ppp3k1/3np3/3p1p2/3P1Ppb/2PBP1Pp/PPR1R2P/4B1K1 b - - 0 24


[D]
4r3/7r/3qpbk1/1p1p1p2/p1pP1Pp1/P1P1P1Pp/BPRn3P/2B4K w - - 0 55


[D]
1r6/r7/3qpbk1/3p1p2/pppP1Pp1/P1P1P1Pp/1PR4P/1B2B1K1 w - - 0 105


[D]
1r6/3r4/2q3k1/3pPp2/pPpP1bp1/P1B1P1Pp/BP5P/6K1 w - - 0 157


[D]
7r/4r3/4q3/1k1pPp2/pPpP1Pp1/P1B3Pp/1P3K1P/5B2 b - - 0 197


NOW THE GREAT RYBKA 2.3.2 MOVE !!!!!!!!!!!!!


[D]
1r6/8/7q/1k1prp2/pPpP1Pp1/P1B3Pp/1P3K1P/5B2 w - - 0 206


[D]
3r4/8/8/1k2Pp2/pPpK1Pp1/P2pB1Pp/1Pq5/8 w - - 0 217


[Event "Partida evaluada, 3m + 0s"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "2007.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Father"]
[Black "Feliks Miszta"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "D00"]
[BlackElo "2740"]
[Annotator "Restrepo,Pablo Ignac"]
[PlyCount "432"]
[EventDate "2007.??.??"]

1. d4 {1} Nf6 {0.00/0 0} 2. c3 {0} d5 {0.00/0 0} 3. e3 {1} Bf5 {0.00/0 0} 4. f4
{0} Nc6 {0.00/0 0} 5. Nf3 {0} e6 {0.00/0 0} 6. Bb5 {2} Bd6 {0.00/0 0} 7. Qd3 {1
} Bxd3 {1} 8. Bxd3 {-3.84/11 0} Ne4 {2} 9. O-O {(Nbd2) -4.10/11 0} f5 {6} 10.
Re1 {(Nbd2) -4.20/11 0} h6 {5} 11. Re2 {(Nbd2) -4.38/10 0} O-O {-4.48/10 5} 12.
Nbd2 {1} g5 {-4.50/9 1} 13. g3 {(Nxe4) 1} Kg7 {-4.56/11 8} 14. Nf1 {(Nb3) 1} g4
{-4.74/11 3} 15. Ne1 {(N3d2) 3} h5 {-4.96/12 3} 16. Ng2 {(Nd2) 0} Be7 {
-4.92/12 4} 17. Bd2 {(Nd2) 3} h4 {-5.07/10 4} 18. Be1 {(gxh4) 0} h3 {-5.58/12 3
} 19. Nh4 {3} Na5 {-5.58/11 3} 20. Nd2 {3} Nxd2 {-5.56/11 5} 21. Rxd2 {1} Nc4 {
-5.76/11 1} 22. Re2 {(Bxc4) 2} Nd6 {-5.74/11 6} 23. Rc1 {(Kf1) 3} Bxh4 {3} 24.
Rcc2 {(gxh4) -5.74/9 0} Be7 {-7.85/13 16} 25. Kh1 {(b3) 0} Qd7 {-7.91/11 5} 26.
Bf2 {(Rc1) 1} Ne4 {-7.95/9 2} 27. Be1 {(Bxe4) 2} c5 {-8.09/11 2} 28. Rc1 {2} c4
{-8.10/12 1} 29. Bc2 {1} a5 {-8.15/11 0} 30. Bb1 {(Bd2) 2} a4 {-8.20/12 2} 31.
a3 {0} Kg6 {-8.22/11 2} 32. Rcc2 {(Kg1) 2} Ra5 {-8.28/11 2} 33. Bd2 {(Rc1) 4}
Rb5 {-8.38/12 5} 34. Ba2 {(Be1) 1} Qd6 {-8.34/10 5} 35. Bc1 {(Kg1) 2} Bf6 {
-8.30/9 2} 36. Kg1 {(Re1) 1} Ra5 {-8.28/9 2} 37. Kh1 {(Kf1) 1} Rf7 {-8.32/9 3}
38. Kg1 {(Bd2) 0} b5 {-8.25/8 2} 39. Kh1 {(Bd2) 1} Rg7 {-8.33/8 2} 40. Kg1 {
(Re1) 0} Ra8 {-8.28/8 1} 41. Kh1 {(Bd2) 0} Rh7 {-8.41/7 1} 42. Kg1 {(Re1) 1}
Re8 {-8.23/7 5} 43. Kh1 {(Bd2) 0} Rf7 {-8.38/8 2} 44. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 1} Qb6 {
-8.27/7 3} 45. Kh1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rd7 {-8.34/7 1} 46. Bb1 {(Re1) 1} Qd6 {-8.23/6 1}
47. Ba2 {(Bd2) 0} Rc8 {-8.33/8 3} 48. Bb1 {(Re1) 0} Ra7 {-8.23/6 2} 49. Ba2 {
(Bd2) 0} Rac7 {-8.36/7 1} 50. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 1} Rb7 {-8.22/6 3} 51. Ba2 {(Kg1) 0}
Rh7 {-8.35/7 1} 52. Bb1 {(Kg1) 1} Ra8 {-8.23/7 5} 53. Ba2 {(Kg1) 0} Re8 {
-8.33/6 1} 54. Red2 {(Re1) 1} Nxd2 {-9.21/6 0} 55. Bxd2 {0} Rc8 {-9.48/6 0} 56.
Kg1 {1} Rhc7 {-9.42/8 2} 57. Be1 {(Kf2) 1} Ra8 {-9.45/6 1} 58. Bb1 {(Kf2) 1}
Rb7 {-9.61/7 1} 59. Ba2 {(Rc1) 0} Rc8 {-9.47/6 1} 60. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Re7 {
-9.51/6 1} 61. Ba2 {(Rd2) 0} Rf7 {-9.47/6 1} 62. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Qb8 {-9.53/6 0}
63. Ba2 {(Bf2) 0} Qb6 {-9.47/6 1} 64. Bb1 {(Bd2) 1} Qc6 {-9.53/6 0} 65. Ba2 {
(Rc1) 0} Rg8 {-9.45/6 1} 66. Bb1 {(Kf2) 0} Qd6 {-9.47/6 0} 67. Ba2 {(Rc1) 0}
Qb8 {-9.45/6 1} 68. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rb7 {-9.53/7 0} 69. Ba2 {(Bd2) 0} Rh7 {
-9.45/6 0} 70. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Ra7 {-9.51/6 0} 71. Ba2 {(Bf2) 0} Qb6 {-9.45/6 1}
72. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Qd6 {-9.56/7 0} 73. Ba2 {(Rd2) 0} Rc8 {-9.53/5 0} 74. Bb1 {
(Bd2) 0} Rf8 {-9.51/6 0} 75. Ba2 {(Bf2) 0} Rh7 {-9.53/5 0} 76. Bb1 {(Bd2) 0}
Ra8 {-9.47/6 1} 77. Ba2 {(Rd2) 0} Rg8 {-9.53/5 0} 78. Bb1 {(Bd2) 0} Qb6 {
-8.59/4 0} 79. Ba2 {(Rc1) 0} Rc8 {-9.52/5 0} 80. Bb1 {(Bd2) 0} Qd6 {-9.52/5 0}
81. Ba2 {(Kf2) 0} Ra8 {-9.52/5 0} 82. Bb1 {(Bd2) 0} Re8 {-9.52/5 0} 83. Ba2 {
(Rd2) 0} Rb7 {-9.52/5 0} 84. Bb1 {(Bd2) 0} Rc8 {-9.51/6 0} 85. Ba2 {(Rd2) 0}
Rd7 {-9.54/6 0} 86. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Qb6 {-9.51/5 0} 87. Ba2 {(Bf2) 1} Ra8 {
-9.52/5 0} 88. Bb1 {(Bd2) 0} Rda7 {-9.47/6 0} 89. Ba2 {(Rf2) 0} Qd6 {-8.77/2 0}
90. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rb8 {-8.63/3 0} 91. Ba2 {(Bd2) 0} Rh8 {-8.74/4 0} 92. Bb1 {
(Bxc4) 0} Rc8 {-8.68/3 0} 93. Ba2 {(Rd2) 0} Rd8 {-8.70/4 0} 94. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0}
Rh7 {-8.78/1 0} 95. Ba2 {(Rd2) 0} Rb8 {-8.66/4 0} 96. Bb1 {(Kh1) 0} Rbh8 {
-8.69/3 0} 97. Ba2 {(Bf2) 0} Rf7 {-8.82/1 0} 98. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rc7 {-8.69/3 0}
99. Ba2 {(Rc1) 0} Rg8 {-8.79/2 0} 100. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rb8 {-8.74/1 0} 101. Ba2
{(Bd2) 0} Re7 {-8.78/3 0} 102. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rf7 {-9.22/5 0} 103. Ba2 {(Kf2) 0
} Ra7 {-8.21/4 0} 104. Bb1 {(Kf2) 0} b4 {-8.91/5 0} 105. cxb4 {(axb4) 1} Rab7 {
-8.21/3 0} 106. Bc3 {0} Ra8 {-8.73/6 0} 107. Ba2 {(Rc1) 1} Rh8 {-8.14/3 0} 108.
Bb1 {(Rc1) 0} Rg8 {-8.31/1 0} 109. Ba2 {(Rc1) 0} Rf8 {-8.12/4 0} 110. Bb1 {
(Rc1) 0} Rbb8 {-8.12/3 0} 111. Ba2 {(Rc1) 0} Rf7 {-8.12/4 0} 112. Bb1 {(Rc1) 0}
Rh7 {-8.12/3 0} 113. Ba2 {(Kf2) 0} Rd7 {-8.21/3 0} 114. Rf2 {(Rc1) 1} Rdb7 {
-8.13/4 0} 115. Kf1 {(Bb1) 2} Ra8 {-8.21/1 0} 116. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Qc6 {
-8.14/2 0} 117. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rc8 {-8.17/1 0} 118. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Re8 {
-8.14/2 0} 119. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Qb5 {-8.04/4 0} 120. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 1} Rh7 {
-8.10/4 0} 121. Kf1 {(Bb1) 0} Rb8 {-8.04/4 0} 122. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Qc6 {-8.16/3 0
} 123. Kf1 {(Bb1) 0} Rhb7 {-8.02/4 0} 124. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rc8 {-8.20/3 0} 125.
Kf1 {(Bb1) 0} Qb6 {-8.02/4 0} 126. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Qd6 {-8.17/2 0} 127. Kf1 {
(Bxc4) 0} Rh8 {-8.09/2 0} 128. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Re8 {-8.31/1 0} 129. Kf1 {
(Bxc4) 0} Reb8 {-8.02/4 0} 130. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Rc7 {-8.10/4 0} 131. Kf1 {(Bb1) 0
} Ra7 {-8.12/3 0} 132. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Rf7 {-8.10/4 0} 133. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rc7 {
-8.10/3 0} 134. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Qc6 {-8.10/4 0} 135. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rh7 {
-8.05/2 0} 136. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Ra8 {-8.20/3 0} 137. Kf1 {(Bb1) 0} Qd6 {
-8.10/3 0} 138. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Rc8 {-8.20/3 0} 139. Kf1 {(b5) 0} Rd8 {-8.05/2 0}
140. Kg1 {(Ke2) 0} Qb6 {-8.10/4 0} 141. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rb7 {-8.02/4 0} 142. Kg1
{(Ke2) 0} Qd6 {-8.12/4 0} 143. Kf1 {(Bb1) 0} Qc6 {-8.02/4 0} 144. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0
} Rg8 {-8.12/4 0} 145. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Qd6 {-8.12/1 0} 146. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rf8 {
-8.20/3 0} 147. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rh7 {-8.12/3 0} 148. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Ra8 {
-8.24/1 0} 149. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rc8 {-8.13/1 0} 150. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Ra7 {
-8.20/3 0} 151. Kf1 {(Bb1) 0} Rd7 {-8.02/4 0} 152. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rb8 {
-8.30/1 0} 153. Kf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Qc6 {-7.05/4 0} 154. Kg1 {(Bxc4) 0} e5 {
-7.16/2 0} 155. fxe5 {1} Bg5 {-8.14/12 0} 156. Rf4 {(Bd2) 1} Bxf4 {-10.14/5 0}
157. exf4 {(gxf4) 0} Re7 {-10.52/5 0} 158. Kf2 {0} Kf7 {-10.47/14 0} 159. Kg1 {
(Bb1) 0} Ke6 {-9.62/2 0} 160. Kf2 {(Bb1) 0} Rf8 {-9.37/4 0} 161. Bb1 {(Bxc4) 0}
Ra8 {-9.38/4 0} 162. Bc2 {0} Qb5 {-10.34/9 0} 163. Bd1 {(Ke3) 0} Kf7 {
-10.39/5 0} 164. Bc2 {0} Kg6 {-10.36/13 0} 165. Bd1 {(Ke3) 0} Rae8 {-10.32/5 0}
166. Bc2 {(Bxa4) 0} Rb7 {-10.33/5 0} 167. Bd1 {(Ke3) 0} Qc6 {-9.29/1 0} 168.
Bc2 {0} Rbe7 {-10.27/11 0} 169. Bd1 {(Ke3) 0} Qa6 {-9.28/4 0} 170. Bc2 {
(Bxa4) 0} Rb8 {-10.28/5 0} 171. Bd1 {(Ke3) 0} Qb5 {-9.30/3 0} 172. Be2 {(Bc2) 0
} Qc6 {-10.38/5 0} 173. Bf1 {(Ke3) 0} Qd7 {-10.49/5 0} 174. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Kf7
{-10.30/6 0} 175. Bf1 {(Bd1) 0} Qb5 {-9.49/4 0} 176. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Ke6 {
-9.43/5 0} 177. Bf1 {(Bxc4) 0} Rc8 {-9.52/4 0} 178. Be2 {0} Rce8 {-10.35/9 0}
179. Bf1 {(Ke3) 0} Rb7 {-9.57/2 0} 180. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Rh7 {-9.40/4 0} 181. Bf1
{(Bxc4) 0} Rc7 {-9.51/4 0} 182. Be2 {0} Qd7 {-10.33/10 0} 183. Bf1 {(Bd1) 0}
Rb7 {-9.51/4 0} 184. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Rb6 {-10.36/5 0} 185. Bf1 {(Ke3) 0} Qb5 {
-9.48/4 0} 186. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Kd7 {-9.37/4 0} 187. Bf1 {(Bd1) 0} Rbe6 {
-10.45/6 0} 188. Be2 {0} Kc6 {-10.44/11 0} 189. Bf1 {(Bd1) 0} Qb7 {-9.61/3 0}
190. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Kb5 {-10.52/6 0} 191. Bf1 {(Bxc4+) 0} Qc7 {-10.57/6 0} 192.
Be2 {0} Qf7 {-10.43/10 0} 193. Bf1 {(Bd1) 0} Rb8 {-9.67/1 0} 194. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0
} Re7 {-9.51/5 0} 195. Bf1 {(Bxc4+) 0} Qe6 {-9.67/1 0} 196. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Rh8
{-9.57/4 0} 197. Bf1 {(Ke3) 0} Rb7 {-9.67/1 0} 198. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Re8 {
-9.51/5 0} 199. Bf1 {(Bd1) 0} Rh7 {-9.66/1 0} 200. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Rc7 {
-9.49/5 0} 201. Bf1 {(Ke3) 0} Rb8 {-9.57/4 0} 202. Be2 {(Bxh3) 0} Re7 {
-9.57/1 0} 203. Bf1 {(Bxc4+) 0} Qc6 {-10.58/5 0} 204. Be2 {0} Qh6 {-8.30/10 0}
205. Bf1 {(Bd1) 0} Rxe5 {-8.23/3 0} 206. dxe5 {(fxe5) 3} Qb6+ {-10.22/7 0} 207.
Ke2 {. 5} Qg1 {-15.81/13 0} 208. Be1 {2} d4 {-23.65/11 0} 209. Bf2 {(Bd2) 1}
Qxh2 {-8.84/1 0} 210. Ke1 {(e6) 2} Re8 {-11.40/3 0} 211. Ke2 {2} d3+ {-#9/11 0}
212. Ke3 {1} Qh1 {-#9/6 0} 213. Kd2 {(e6) 3} Qxf1 {-12.28/1 0} 214. Be3 {(e6) 1
} Qe2+ {-16.23/1 0} 215. Kc3 {(Kc1) 1} Qc2+ {-#2/1 0} 216. Kd4 {1} Rd8# {
(Lag: Av=0.61s, max=1.6s) -#1/3 0} 0-1

With best respect,

PABLO
FATHER

Parent - - By Lukas Cimiotti (Bronze) Date 2007-08-06 19:28
Hello Father / Pablo
i really like your style of anti-computer chess (if thats chess at all)
Do you remember me - you played several games against my computer. I was (and i am) on Chessbase with the nicks "Rechenschieber", "Victor_Kullberg" and "Abdul H" - I don't remember agaist wich account you played. Using Deep Shredder in those days - before Rybka was born - there was a simple way to win against you. I only had to set engines parameters to "prefer open positions" and you had no chance. Some other guy told me one more recipe to win against you: just put knights value below pawns value - i didn't try this trick, but it must have worked.
Good luck in further games
Lukas
Parent - - By Hetman (*****) Date 2007-08-06 20:55
Hi,

you have  touched very interesting problem 'what is chess and what is not chess'. ;-) It is a bit philosophical
but could you explain what is chess in your opinion ? It might be theme for wide discussion.

I was thinking that it is a logical and strategical  game which goal is to win. To achieve that everyone could use proper way of play.
It has been nothing strange that  the players playing vs young Tal  tried to get closed positions or exchange pieces to minimize his advantage in phantasy and calculating. The players playing vs Karpov tried to avoid manouvering positions.

It is logical that player playing against computer programm (which in calculations is much more powerful then young Tal) is going to closed, strategical positions. I think that it is unwise to play vs computer tactical positions. It looks for us strange but closing position  might be the only way not to loose. Using other strategy looks like selfkilling.
The difference between human and calculating device is
that human is able to learn from his mistakes and adapt to the situation. Programms are not able to do it, fortunately for us.
If the human is trying not to loose the race in the one possible way it shall be acceptable.
Putting the knight value lower then pawn  or prefering open positions etc is the same strange strategy  if we are speaking in cathegories of ideal chess ;-).

Rgds
Hetman
Parent - - By Father (**) Date 2007-08-07 01:02
Hello Hetman.
I think, that a chess game  without traditional paradigms, is chess too.
Chess have been played in the same face of a same coin. Searching for the mate.

The mate is not the more important in chess.

Then, "anti-chess", is   the same  chess but playing in the other face, across, "antiparadigms principles".
Puting crazy the oponent.

Antichess is a  real 'psychological game', against machines that were not disigned for solve the antichess;
Antichess could be played  against human beings, that are looking all the time for the atack.

It(antichess)  is the same intelligence, but used in other way. "The anti-codes;"" or; the anti-war."

Antichess is like a "black hole"; you cross the hole, and will be coming to the unreasonable or absurde Universe.
But like a real universe too.

With a flexible concept, you must be capable to turn on your antichess mode, and turn off the chess switch.
The secret, has a divice por adjusting the paradigms +1 ande -1.

Best,

Pablo
Parent - By turbojuice1122 (Gold) Date 2007-08-07 02:55
I think that what people are getting at is that the goal of chess IS to eventually bring about checkmate.  Losing on time due (helped by the opponent having some lag over an internet connection) to not having an increment is simply a technicality, one that didn't exist until the much later ages of chess.  Nonetheless, being able to blockade the position like this against programs shows that something needs to be tweaked in the programming.  However, at this point, you've basically been showing what is, for all practical purposes, the same game played in slightly different ways.  Do you have examples of very different setups in which this has occurred?  Your example with the queen sacrifice on the bishop was a good alternative, because there the opponent had a huge material advantage that he didn't convert (while meanwhile, any human player would have sacrificed something in the early middlegame).  In particular, do you have any examples where you have succeeded in doing this with the black pieces?  How about wins or draws against programs like Chess Tiger 2007 on human mode, which have been actively tuned to prevent setups such as those that you have shown here?  Even better, have you ever succeeded in doing this against a centaur?  My guess is that out of 50 games against a slightly below-average centaur at time controls of 15'+15" or so, you would never succeed in creating these types of positions and getting a draw.  I intentionally say this hoping that you'll prove me wrong, as that would give some nice insight on weaknesses in how we think about chess.
Parent - By Hetman (*****) Date 2007-08-07 18:48
Hi Father,

I agree that the traditional chess strategy is not the must. The chess are changing itselves with the new inventions. It could be that in 15 years could have been revolution concerning the way of the 'proper' playing style.:-).

I would not called it antichess.  Antichess has defined Victor Korchnoi for me in his book 'Antichess'. It was about the chess out of the desk.

That what you have invented it is chess with the strategy directed to the particular type of 'enemy'. It looks for me as the natural, healthy reaction to the computer strategy - tactical play. The reaction to it is the anti-human or prefer open positions factor. So if anti-human factor is allowed then the anti-computer factor is allowed too :-).

The history of chess knows similar developments. W. Steinitz has developed positional (defensive) play as the reaction to the romantic attacking chess (computers are not romantic they are calculating devices).

Your invention proves that you understand the chess.
It is the great achievement. Some Gm's play good but they do not understand the play they just know how to play in that or the other type of the position.
I just have the idea that it could be organised the tournament in which would be discovered the best anti-computer player.
It could happent that it would be not the GM !

Regards
Hetman
Parent - By turbojuice1122 (Gold) Date 2007-08-06 21:17
Ahh, but does this not present itself immediately with a solution?  If one can beat this style with "prefer open positions" or by putting knight value above pawn, why not do some programming such that when these sorts of positions are close to being reached, or are seen to be reached in the search, to automatically alter these values such that these sorts of closed positions don't occur, or that they don't remain closed (as long as you don't give away the advantage)?
Parent - - By kaustubh (**) Date 2007-08-07 04:11
hi father,
               Vasik is going to add algorithms to avoid such positions  in rybka 3. I think it's going to be difficult in rybka version 3.
Parent - By Hetman (*****) Date 2007-08-07 18:50
Thesis - antithesis -synthesis ;-)
Rgds
Hetman
Parent - - By Banned for Life (Gold) Date 2007-08-07 04:36
Mechanical orange? Is that anything like A Clockwork Orange? Do you listen to William Tell's Overture while you are playing these games?

"Bliss, bliss and heaven.... Hear all proper. Hear angel trumpets and devil trombones. You are all invited."

Regards,
Alan
Parent - By Psilocybe (**) Date 2007-08-07 15:35
A Spanish free translation (praised by translators of the Burgess' novel and Kubrick's film later) for "A clockwork orange"  is "Naranja mec├ínica." Someone who ignores this would translate it back to English as "Mechanical orange", literally. Who else is that ingenuous than Restrepo?
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